booklike

  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following
  • following

WELCOME

to a place

where i (jennifer chisnell, MSLIS) crank out

images | text | sites

encountered, pertaining to

art, artist books, antiquarian books, books, book art, book sculpture, book shelves, cats, collectors, curators, design, or, eyeglasses, exhibitions, fashion history, libraries, librarians, literature, maps, museums, neuroscience, paper, pianos, poets, presses, typewriters, typography, victrolas, wunderkammern, & cetera whimsy

occasionally straying

A Short History Of Typewriter Art

Book Roulette

My situation has certainly shifted.

15 months ago, I was an underemployed professional librarian. 3 months ago, I was a secretary at an ad agency.  Today, I am in the middle of an apprenticeship as a Content Specialist for a UX startup.

I never thought I’d actually be getting paid to write, even if it’s just writing product descriptions for e-commerce.  But here I am.  

I went more or less dormant as a producer-of-verbiage for the best part of a decade.  But then, seemingly out of nowhere, my occasional knack for the written word got me in through the side door to a new career path in the field of UX. 

I’ve got quite a portfolio to build before I’ll actually be very marketable within this new trajectory—all sorts of skills, from PhotoShop to PHP, to study and practice before I’m competent tackling one of the possible angles to the practice of UX/UI/IA/and their cluster of related activities.

In the meantime, I’ve got to work what I’ve got.

And every Web Content Writer worth her salt has a blog. 

Therein lies my dilemma.  If I want to capitalize on my experience this summer, I need to start having conversations with readers.  

Read More

100 Most Creative People 2014

800
"

The only Hebrew version of the perennially popular Arthurian legends was written in northern Italy in 1279. […] The 13th-century Italian Jewish translator’s literary methods are as fascinating as are the Arthurian stories in Hebrew dress. The scribe not only translates from Italian, [..] he also changed and Judaized the story. The scribe’s manner of Judaization is evident at the outset of the romance; the apology itself is filled with terms from a familiar Jewish world.

Instrumental to the Judaization of the Arthurian romance are the scribe’s choice of plot (the seduction of Igerne by the king, with its parallels to the David-Bath-Sheba story), additions and omissions, use of language, and treatment of certain passages to stress Jewish ideas. For instance, the feast at which Uther meets Igerne is described in the Old French sources as a Christmas feast. In the Hebrew version, the statement “Then the king made a great feast for all the people and all the princes” (based on Esth. 2:18) conveys the aura of a Purim feast.

Another example of such transference of concepts occurs when the translator takes the talmudic word tamḥui (“a charity bowl from which food was distributed to the needy”), with its uniquely Jewish associations, to describe the grail, an overtly Christian symbol. The constant use of well-known biblical phrases reminds the reader of religious literature and produces the effect of biblical scenes in the midst of the Arthurian narrative. In this fashion, then, the text and the language interact in polyphonic fashion.

"

Jewish Virtual Library |  King Artus: A Hebrew Arthurian Romance of 1279 (via bors-of-gaunis)

Reblogged 4 months ago from kleenexwoman

Rewards of being a piano teacher

2773

farmingtonlibrary:

book sculpture by Madrid-based Spanish artist Alicia Martín (x)

(Source: mymodernmet.com)

Reblogged 9 months ago from fuckyeahbookarts
2085

unknowneditors:

Nicholas Jones born 1974 in UK,  is an international book sculptor based in Melbourne Australia. He completed a Bachelor of Fine Art at the Victorian College of the Arts in 1997, Master of Fine Art at RMIT University in 2001 and a Graduate Diploma of Education at The University of Melbourne in 2003.

Nicholas Jones aims at highlight- ing the poetic nature of the book as a form. From his tiny Melbourne studio, he stacks, folds, tears, cuts and sews book leaves, transforming books into works of art, small sculptures that question the way books are read. Like a surgeon examin- ing and reorganizing body tissue, armed with a scalpel, Jones readdresses the book’s tissue – paper – dissecting unwanted books, casting a new light on books as an everyday commodity.
From Where They Create. Text by Alexandra Onderwater.

Facebook

We’re Unknown Editors

Check us out on facebookinstagram & twitter.

One of my favorite book sculptors!

Reblogged 9 months ago from fuckyeahbookarts
6

rhondaayliffe:

Rhonda Ayliffe

aequat omnes cinis - ‘The ash makes all things equal’
One charred volume of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Sams Creek schoolhouse

(via art and etc: three books… three tales…)

Reblogged 9 months ago from bookron
102590

(Source: randombookblog)

Reblogged 9 months ago from bookuse
1

chalkback:

Anarchist
Book
Fair
Saturday

Reblogged 10 months ago from chalkback
852434

unashamedradiance:

When I’m almost done reading a good book.

Reblogged 1 year ago from fuckyeahbookarts

Mid-laugh

7

rhondaayliffe:

Rhonda Ayliffe
32 volumes of The Encyclopeadia of the World and its People
placed on the tide line
Cuttagee Beach, Bermagui

(via art and etc: TAG - 15)

Reblogged 1 year ago from bookron
2151

free-parking:

Anselm Kiefer — Tannhäuser, lead books with thorns, 2000

Reblogged 1 year ago from fuckyeahbookarts
Theme By Idraki and Powered by Tumblr 2010.
Typerwriter and Paper Image Courtesy of Google. Icon Credited to Webdesignerdepot